5 Data Trends to Know

Most institutions of higher education understand the importance of research data, especially in marketing. When interpreted and applied to your unique marketing environment, data provides insights on a myriad of tactical issues you deal with every day: overall marketplace trends, where to reach potential students, how to best reach them, programs likely to grow, and those projected to decline.

Just as importantly, the marketing director should use research to counsel leadership in overall planning of short-term and long-term goals and to provide the broad guidelines for strategic planning. It is incumbent on the marketing team to provide institutional leadership with data on emerging trends and opportunities that will inform and assist organizational growth and stability.

Without such a systematic application of data, marketers – and institutions – sometimes employ tactics that are unrealistic. The time, effort, and resources spent on ineffective efforts can even set your institution back. David Ogilvy, “The Father of Advertising,” once said, “Advertising people who ignore research are as dangerous as generals who ignore decades of enemy signals.”

Five top trends that exert major impact on your institution’s ability to achieve its strategic goals are:

  • Population trends
  • Student migration trends
  • Workforce trends
  • Trends in distance education
  • Trends in the use of technology

Below is an interactive map from EMG’s Strategy Brief #205: Five Data Trends You Need to Know About, that allows you to identify and filter the projected population trends in your specific state and region.

This is an excerpt from the 25-page September-October 2011 EMG Strategy Brief #205: Five Data Trends You Need to Know About.

Published by

Angela Brennan

Marketing Management Specialist

Angela Brennan is EMG's Marketing Management Analyst. She provides services in accounting, financial issues, analytics, and technical support. She had more than seven years of experience in the accounting field while working for a Fortune 500 electronic and computer distributor. Her background includes accounts payable, cost-benefit analysis, and compensation. During that time, she was also responsible for networking, creating and maintaining databases, data analysis, and computer software design and testing.

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